Ask.  

lehroi:

Corey McCorkle
When a Dog Barks The Response in the Ear of the Sky is a Star, 2007.

lehroi:

Corey McCorkle

When a Dog Barks The Response in the Ear of the Sky is a Star, 2007.

(Source: jemeos, via oxyconten)

— 1 month ago with 466 notes


Red on Green
: the life and death of 10,000 roses

(Source: slowartday, via hithertoandfurtherstill)

— 1 month ago with 181548 notes

likeafieldmouse:

George Brassai - Graffiti (published 1961)

"Best known for his photographs of nocturnal Paris and its demimonde, Brassai also took pictures of wall carvings and markings over three decades. He was interested in how the images eventually altered, either through additions by later graffiti artists or because of the vagaries of time.” 

From a 1964 interview with Brassai:

Brassai, we can say that you’ve been the photographer of Paris’s walls. How did you get so interested in all of these graffiti that made you so famous, in addition to all of these other activities?

Well, I often walked through Paris and I often observed the walls and I thought that everything that takes place on the walls is very interesting. 

There are even cracks in the walls, and there are graffiti that people secretly painted there, and I started taking pictures of these things as of 1930-1932. 

I had little notepads on which I wrote down the addresses, I could follow their development, because it was a collective work, there were many other people who painted and continued a graffito.

And they say that Picasso followed many of the graffiti artists.

In fact, Picasso himself really likes them, he’s done graffiti, in Montmartre, many of them, and he told me, in a bank, one day he was waiting, he found, he made a graffito, on a wall, and then the manager found out that it was a graffito by Picasso, so he had the wall taken apart, and now it’s in his apartment, along.

(via blue-voids)

— 1 month ago with 1345 notes

everyartisthasabday:

Marina Abramović and Ulay sat as one, sharing a braid, for 16 hours. Only for the final hour did they allow an audience.

Even while staying still, how much did they change over time?

(Relation in Time, 1977)

(via vulcanobaby)

— 2 months ago with 1953 notes

2headedsnake:

Francisco Infante-Arana & Nonna Gorunova

(Source: ineedaguide.blogspot.com, via bbloodshake)

— 2 months ago with 713 notes

2headedsnake:

Paper sculptures by Peter Gentenaar

(Source: featherofme.com, via cessze)

— 2 months ago with 4370 notes

womaninterrupted:

bobbycaputo:

'Spinster' Photographer Poses With Mannequin Family to Depict the American Dream

Denver-based photographer and art director Suzanne Heintz was fed up with people asking her when she was going to get married. From her mother’s direct plea, “Just pick somebody!” to others’ woeful sighs of pity, Heintz lived half her life wondering where she had gone wrong. After years of struggling to politely answer the question, she decided to procure the house, husband, and offspring everyone so desperately felt was the pathway to happiness. Purchasing a pair of second-hand mannequins, Heintz set about playing house to achieve the American Dream. From a Parisian holiday to Christmas cards of wildly escalating happiness, Life Once Removedis a sharp, witty critique on the archaic expectations of domestic bliss and fulfillment.

Brilliant.

(via knockedupsunshine)

— 2 months ago with 13033 notes
time-undone:

Jeff Mermelstein, Untitled (Burning Shoe NYC), 1995

time-undone:

Jeff Mermelstein, Untitled (Burning Shoe NYC), 1995

— 2 months ago with 5 notes
weepling:

palace of tears, nelly agassi, 2002
at the center of the exhibition space stands a young woman, wearing a simple skin-colored dress; hundreds of strips made of similar fabric are suspended from various points on the four walls surrounding her. some trail on the floor, reaching her feet, others look as though they are already, somehow, connected to her dress. she bends, picks up a strip of fabric from the floor, sews it onto her dress, and so on and so forth. strip after strip, hour in hour out, in a cyclical, sequential act, until no more fabric strips remain on the floor, and she appears inseparably connected to the walls of the exhibition space.

weepling:

palace of tears, nelly agassi, 2002

at the center of the exhibition space stands a young woman, wearing a simple skin-colored dress; hundreds of strips made of similar fabric are suspended from various points on the four walls surrounding her. some trail on the floor, reaching her feet, others look as though they are already, somehow, connected to her dress. she bends, picks up a strip of fabric from the floor, sews it onto her dress, and so on and so forth. strip after strip, hour in hour out, in a cyclical, sequential act, until no more fabric strips remain on the floor, and she appears inseparably connected to the walls of the exhibition space.

(Source: shoulderblades)

— 2 months ago with 2920 notes

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

 Johnson Tsang Brings Ceramic Bowls and Cups to Life

With an adept understanding of ceramics and anatomy, Hong-Kong based artist Johnson Tsang  creates strange and unexpected anthropomorphic sculptures where human forms seem to splash effortlessly through functional objects like bowls, plates, and cups. While the works shown here are mostly innocent and comical in nature the artist is unafraid of veering into more macabre subject matter in other artworks that grapple with war and violence.

(Source: asylum-art, via adding)

— 3 months ago with 10340 notes
adventicemagazine:

Falling Falling with mirrors installation by Rafaël Rozendaal at Nordin Gallery Stockholm, November 2011

adventicemagazine:

Falling Falling with mirrors installation by Rafaël Rozendaal at Nordin Gallery Stockholm, November 2011

(via 505th)

— 3 months ago with 5612 notes

All days death was waiting for you. That was the strong conviction of late medieval people. And that’s why memento mori - remember that you will die - was a very common expression in late medieval society. Johan Huizinga wrote one of the most impressive chapters of his Autumn of the Middle Ages on this theme. In literature, in preaching and in art: everywhere people were confronted with this truth. And the most confronting way to make this clear was to depict Death calling for the man to come with him and to leave the world of the living. This miniature from a French Book of Hours is a very remarkable example: a disturbing image to disturb the beholders: death is about to call you! Beware!
ParisBN NAL3191

(Source: johanoosterman, via ixstrerfbrightside)

— 3 months ago with 265 notes
insolacion:

The Great Wave off Kanagawa (1829) by Katsushika Hokusai

insolacion:

The Great Wave off Kanagawa (1829) by Katsushika Hokusai

(via danslebayou)

— 3 months ago with 54 notes